Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations

These industrious pollinators are essential to our ecosystem and their numbers on our planet are on a serious decline.

This information is cold comfort if you have a bee swarm at your property or even a bee hive in your cavity wall that is causing havoc and impacting on your lifestyle and enjoyment of being outdoors.

  • Bees swarm during spring (generally between September and November).
  • Swarming bees are looking to establish a new hive, normally in a hollow tree trunk.
  • However, due to the dwindling number of trees in our suburbs and regular land clearing, bees are being evicted from their natural habitat and forced to sometimes make homes (hives) in cavity walls.

Civil Pest Management technicians are registered amateur beekeepers with the NSW Department of Primary Industries – Apiaries Act 1985. Being second generation beekeepers, we have approximately 2 million honey bees under our care.

Our Ethical Beehive Swarm Removal service places the importance of bees in our ecosystem at its core. Using our gentle capture and relocation process, bees are removed from unwanted areas, including inside cavity walls or even inside tree trunks and then transported to our apiaries, where they are housed and nurtured until such-time a permanent home is found.

Our first approach is to always seek ways to save the bees. However, sometimes, bees form hives in hard-to reach places, like double brick cavity walls. Unfortunately, in some cases the bees cannot be saved.

Do you want to become a Beekeeper?

Amateur beekeeping is one of the fastest growing past time hobbies for all ages in Australia today.

You can find more information about becoming an amateur beekeeper by visiting the Amateur Beekeepers Association NSW

It is recommended that you undertake a ‘basic’ bee course prior to starting your own beehive.

You can find more information about bee courses by visiting the Urban beekeeping and supplies.com.au

Do you want to buy bee-hive?

YES – we supply bee hives.

The majority of our bee hives are rescued bees from either cavity walls or swarms that have been removed from buildings.

Should you wish to purchase a mature beehive or a swarm give us a call today or contact us online.

Bee FACTS:

  • A colony of bees consists of 20,000-60,000 honey bees and one Queen. Worker honey bees are female, live for about 6 weeks and do all the work. 
  • In their 6-8 week lifespan, a worker bee will fly the equivalent distance of one and a half times the circumference of the Earth. The Queen bee has a life span of approximately 5 years.
  • Male honey bees (also called drones), have no stinger and do no work. All they do is mate with the Queen and then go to bee heaven.
  • The honey bee is the only insect that produces food consumed by humans.
  • The bees' buzz is the sound made by their wings which beat 11,400 times per minute.
  • When a bee finds a good source of nectar it flies back to the hive and shows its friends where the nectar source is by doing a dance which positions the flower in relation to the sun and hive. This is known as the 'waggle dance.'
  • Approximately one third of the food we eat is the result of honey bee pollination. Pollination is vital in helping plants grow, breed and produce food.
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations
  • Sydney Bee Removal and Ethical Relocations

Bee FAQs

Why do bees swarm?

Bees swarm for a number of reasons and its part of natures’ process of evolution in growing the bee population by establishing new colonies. Bees swarm ‘generally’ during spring (Sep to Dec) however, they could swarm as late as January and as early as August.

The main drivers for bees to swarm from an existing hive is due to the following reasons:

  • The bee hive has reached full capacity and run out of room.
  • The Queen has reached full breeding capacity and is being replaced by a newly anointed Queen.
  • The old Queen will vacate (i.e. swarm) the hive and take anywhere between 5,000 – 20,000 bees with her to find a new home and create a new hive.
How do I know if bees are swarming around my back yard?

Swarming bees will generally fly around in a cluster (like a cloud of bees) circling around a tree branch, flowering bush, fence, house eves, wall, anything really. They will eventually land, group together to form an oblong shape (similar to a football).

They will temporarily land to allow the Queen to rest. The swarm will rest anywhere between 1-3 days before moving into their newly found home to form a hive.
 

What do I do if I find bees swarming around a tree or around my house?

An experienced, trained bee keeper who understands bee behaviour, is able to go close to the swarm, using special equipment can capture and relocate the swarm.

However, for any other person we strongly advise not to go near the swarm and do not attempt to spray the bees with any insecticide. Just remember, on average there is approx. 20,000 bees in a swarm. You should close all windows and external doors. At night, ensure there is no shining lights facing the swarm of bees and keep the blinds down.

Bees in a swarm should never, ever be exterminated, they do not pose any immediate threat if they are left alone. They will eventually move-on.
 

Why do I keep finding dead bees inside my house?

Sometimes bees lose their way and get trapped inside houses. If you are continuously finding dead bees inside your home, this could be ‘scout bees’ looking to find a suitable home, in readiness for a swarm of bees to arrive.

Alternatively, it could also be that there is a swarm of bees, who have already entered your cavity wall to create a hive and some are finding their way into your living areas through ceiling down lights, gaps around windows, ceiling bath fans or through air vents.

I want to get rid of a swarm of bees but I know they are a valuable part of our ecosystem. How can you help?

As avid, trained beekeepers with the Beekeepers Association of NSW we catch bee swarms as our first and only option for eradicating a bee pest problem. We never spray (destroy) bee swarms and treat them with the respect they deserve as essential members of our ecosystem.

Bees are in my cavity wall. How do I get rid of them?

As avid, trained beekeepers with the Beekeepers Association of NSW we catch bee swarms as our first and only option for eradicating a bee pest problem. We never spray (destroy) bee swarms and treat them with the respect they deserve as essential members of our ecosystem.